lauriehalseanderson
penguinteen:

thehpalliance:

Esther Day is a holiday, but it is not about metaphors. It is not about gestures. Instead of mass produced greeting cards and baked goods, it calls for an uncommon honesty and bravery.
As the story goes, John and Hank Green asked Nerdfighter Esther Earl (now a published author) to decide how the community would celebrate her birthday every year. Given the opportunity to create a holiday, Esther chose to make it about love, family, and friends. When John uploaded the first annual video in August of 2010, he said “The words we use to describe the things we feel matter. […] So maybe Esther Day is the day where we think, ‘who do I love who I have trouble saying I love you to?’”
Esther passed away from thyroid cancer later that month; she was sixteen.
Since then, Nerdfighters have participated in Esther Day, celebrating the power and importance of love. Videos are uploaded, songs are sung, and we tell the people we love that we love them in no uncertain terms.
It sounds simple enough. In truth, it often comes as a challenge – being honest and unapologetic about love almost feels counterintuitive sometimes. We flee vulnerability.
This campaign – like Esther Day – is about changing that.
On Esther Day, we act for love: to uplift each other and create a more positive fandom; to empower and inspire our community; and to increase empathy. Our goal is nothing less than to make Esther Day a globally recognized, baggage-free holiday about love and gratitude.
In the months leading up to Esther Day, we want to make this community an everyday celebration of our favorite holiday. We want you to join in.
Before Esther Day:
Plan your projects and share your plans to inspire others.
Attend a Nerdfighter or HPA Chapter meetup celebrating Esther Day. 
Watch this space for more ways to get involved. When you post, make sure to use #EstherDay!
On Esther Day (August 3rd)
Tell a friend or family member that you love them: pick up the phone, make a YouTube video, send them a text, an email, an owl, or some treacle tart.
Post your final #EstherDay projects online to share them with the world.
You can check out the Esther Day Project page to see some past projects.
This is what it comes down to: love is awesome. Love is important. Love is what saved the wizarding world and, long before that, its residents. Fandoms become communities when we celebrate loving not just a book or a movie, but each other.
Whether it’s via owl post, social media (#EstherDay) or at LeakyCon in Orlando, please join us in celebrating love and celebrating each other during this year’s Esther Day.

Don’t forget, Esther Day is August 3rd! Find out how you can participate here, and submit a message of love. 

penguinteen:

thehpalliance:

Esther Day is a holiday, but it is not about metaphors. It is not about gestures. Instead of mass produced greeting cards and baked goods, it calls for an uncommon honesty and bravery.

As the story goes, John and Hank Green asked Nerdfighter Esther Earl (now a published author) to decide how the community would celebrate her birthday every year. Given the opportunity to create a holiday, Esther chose to make it about love, family, and friends. When John uploaded the first annual video in August of 2010, he said “The words we use to describe the things we feel matter. […] So maybe Esther Day is the day where we think, ‘who do I love who I have trouble saying I love you to?’”

Esther passed away from thyroid cancer later that month; she was sixteen.

Since then, Nerdfighters have participated in Esther Day, celebrating the power and importance of love. Videos are uploaded, songs are sung, and we tell the people we love that we love them in no uncertain terms.

It sounds simple enough. In truth, it often comes as a challenge – being honest and unapologetic about love almost feels counterintuitive sometimes. We flee vulnerability.

This campaign – like Esther Day – is about changing that.

On Esther Day, we act for love: to uplift each other and create a more positive fandom; to empower and inspire our community; and to increase empathy. Our goal is nothing less than to make Esther Day a globally recognized, baggage-free holiday about love and gratitude.

In the months leading up to Esther Day, we want to make this community an everyday celebration of our favorite holiday. We want you to join in.

Before Esther Day:

  • Plan your projects and share your plans to inspire others.
  • Attend a Nerdfighter or HPA Chapter meetup celebrating Esther Day.
  • Watch this space for more ways to get involved. When you post, make sure to use #EstherDay!

On Esther Day (August 3rd)

  • Tell a friend or family member that you love them: pick up the phone, make a YouTube video, send them a text, an email, an owl, or some treacle tart.
  • Post your final #EstherDay projects online to share them with the world.

You can check out the Esther Day Project page to see some past projects.

This is what it comes down to: love is awesome. Love is important. Love is what saved the wizarding world and, long before that, its residents. Fandoms become communities when we celebrate loving not just a book or a movie, but each other.

Whether it’s via owl post, social media (#EstherDay) or at LeakyCon in Orlando, please join us in celebrating love and celebrating each other during this year’s Esther Day.

Don’t forget, Esther Day is August 3rd! Find out how you can participate here, and submit a message of love

penguinteen

penguinteen:

Today we’d like to welcome David Soman to Penguin Teen Meet the Illustrator! His latest book, Three Bears in a Boat, is one of our absolute favorites this summer. Whether or not you’re on the beach, you’ll feel like you are after looking at David’s gorgeous blue (Cerulean! Prussian! Ultramarine!) illustrations. David, the illustrator of Ladybug Girl, is a total master of color, and we’re excited for you to find out more about his life as an artist, illustrator, and art historian!

Name: David Soman 

Book: Three Bears in a Boat

Date Available: Now available in stores!

What media and materials do you use to create your illustrations?

For Three Bears in a Boat, I used watercolors, colored inks, and colored pencils, but it all began with just a pencil!

What’s your favorite color and why?

Well, this is a hard question! I can’t really say I have a favorite color (the other colors might get jealous!). I guess it changes depending on my mood. For this book, I really liked playing with the color blue. It’s amazing how many kinds of blue the sea and the sky can be. Sometimes the blue is warm and soft (a color called Cerulean blue), sometimes it’s a little greenish (a color called Prussian blue), and sometimes it’s just really rich (a color aptly named Ultramarine blue).

Who’s your favorite artist or illustrator, living or dead and why?

Oh buoy (excuse the boating pun), this is another hard one. I actually am a bit of an art history buff, and in my studio I have a huge bookshelf filled with art books. But for this book, I looked at the paintings of Winslow Homer and Joaquim Sorrolla for the seascapes, and Richard Scarry’s and Maurice Sendak’s picture books for the bears. And Elizabeth Zwerger, always Elizabeth Zwerger.

Where do you do your work?

I work in a studio up the hill from my house. It’s close enough to go to work in my pajamas, but far enough so that I can’t keep going to the refrigerator to eat more cake (phew!)

Aside from the text of Three Bears in a Boat, where did you find inspiration for your illustrations?

Some of my favorite childhood memories are the times I spent at the beach on Fire Island; long open days of wind and sun and the sound of the waves. And sometimes (but not enough!) we would go out in little sunfish boats, skipping across the water in the bay.

Also, I grew up across the street from the Museum of Natural History, and spent a lot of time looking up at the Alaskan Brown Bear in the North American wing.

………

Thanks, David!

Order Three Bears in a Boat.

Check out David’s artwork from the Ladybug Girl series here.

edwardspoonhands

josephliveshere asked:

You must hand out corndogs in a corndog suit for a combined 12 hours without eating a single dog of corn

edwardspoonhands answered:

GOD DANGIT AMAZING! “CORNDOG COSTUME”! NOT “CORN DOG COSTUME”! 

Why do so many people want to dress their dogs like corn? WHY!?

They specifically want to dress their dogs as candy corn, rather than actual corn, which I think is even more questionable.